The Opposite Book Tag

Welcome back to Book Tag Thursday! I found this week’s tag on Way Too Fantasy, and then followed the string of previous book tags back to Dreamland Book Blog, but it looks like the original one was a video on YouTube that is now private, so I can’t link back to the original creator.

FIRST BOOK IN YOUR COLLECTION | LAST BOOK YOU BOUGHT

I honestly have absolutely zero clue as to what book was the first book in my collection. I know my parents bought me hundreds of children’s books when I was younger, and I’ve been begging them for books/buying books for myself ever since. I guess we can consider Miss Suzy by Miriam Young to be the first book in my collection (even though I absolutely know it’s not).

On the flip side, the last book I bought was actually four books: Better Luck Next Time by Julia Claiborne Johnson, And I Do Not Forgive You by Amber Sparks, The Lost Queen by Signe Pike, and The Light of Days by Judy Batalion, all purchased after I participated in the San Antonio Book Festival.

A CHEAP BOOK | AN EXPENSIVE BOOK

I guess I’ll go with the most recent cheapest/expensive book that I’ve purchased. I bought Hollow Kingdom for $2.99 as part of a Kindle daily deal, so that’s the cheapest book I’ve read so far.

The most expensive book I’ve bought so far is technically Alba, which was a kickstarter exclusive (it’s more of an RPG-playthrough game instead of an actual book, though), which I spent $70. The most expensive actual book I’ve bought recently is a tie between Better Luck Next Time, The Light of Days, and All the Frequent Troubles of Our Days (a preorder), which I purchased after the afore-mentioned book festival.

A BOOK WITH A MALE PROTAGONIST | ONE WITH A FEMALE PROTAGONIST

A book I’ve read this year with a male protagonist is West With Giraffes by Lynda Rutledge, which follows a teenager as he drives a couple of giraffes cross-country from New York to California during the Dust Bowl era of US history.

One I’ve recently read with a female protagonist is After Alice Fell by Kim Taylor Blakemore, which tells the story of a former Union nurse as she tries to figure out what happened to her sister after she left her behind to go to war.

A BOOK YOU READ FAST | ONE THAT TOOK YOU A LONG TIME TO READ

I’ve read pretty much all of the books I have rather quickly, but let’s put Woman World on here, because it’s a graphic novel.

On the flip side, Ulysses by James Joyce took me the longest and I struggled so hard through it, but I had to read it because it was required for a class.

PRETTY COVER | UGLY COVER

I think Follow Me to Ground has an absolutely gorgeous cover – except it’s an absolutely terrible book. On the flip side, The Faceless Old Woman Who Secretly Lives in Your Home is an absolutely wonderful book with an absolutely terrible cover.

A NATIONAL BOOK | AN INTERNATIONAL BOOK

I’d call To Kill a Mockingbird a national book – every ninth grader is forced to read it in Alabama, because Harper Lee was from Alabama. I’m considered the odd one out because, no matter how many times I’ve read this book, I still don’t understand the hype. In my opinion, it’s poorly written and Go Set a Watchman was much better, but if I say that out loud I get skewered.

Let’s call If Cats Disappeared From the World an international book, because it’s the one that comes to mind before any of the others. It’s a really bittersweet book, and it’s a very fast read.

A THIN BOOK | A THICK BOOK

Night by Elie Wiesel is a very thin book at around a hundred pages, give or take a few of them.

And then A Dance With Dragons by George RR Martin would be a thick book.

A FICTION BOOK | A NONFICTION BOOK

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite would be a fiction book, and a book in a similar vein would be Hell’s Princess by Harold Schechter. Both deal with serial killers – while the sister in the first book has only killed around three people, it’s estimated that Belle Guinness killed between five and a hundred (maybe more). They’ll never find all the bodies of her victims.

ROMANTIC BOOK | ACTION BOOK

I literally have no frame of reference for a romantic book, because not only do I avoid them at all costs, but if I read a YA book that has romance as a main feature (ugh, love triangles), I pretty much try to ignore that and focus on the rest of the story, so sorry to disappoint you on that. Maybe you could consider the first half of The Witch’s Heart to be a romantic book?

And then one of the most action-packed books I’ve read recently has to be Lore by Alexandra Bracken. The action is non-stop throughout the entire book, and I did not see that ending coming.

A BOOK THAT MADE YOU HAPPY | A BOOK THAT MADE YOU SAD MAD

Although it’s an emotional journey, I think the ending of The Thirty Names of Night by Zeyn Joukhadar has a happy ending, and while I’m usually not a fan of stories that wrap everything up with a neat little bow, I’ll make an exception for this, because our protagonist really didn’t need to suffer any more than he already had.

And then I’m changing the second half from sad to mad, because I need to talk about The Devil and the Dark Water and how terrible of a book it turned out to be in the end. I even talked about it with my college roommate (who has a wonderful bookstagram that you should follow) and we’re wondering how on earth it’s supposed to be turned into a movie.

This book tag really made me think! What about you? Did one of my answers surprise you? As always, if you’re reading this, consider yourself tagged, and be sure to tag the original creator if you do it (and me, too! I love reading your answers!).

And as always, keep reading.

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